The Next Layer is a collaborative environment combining open source, experimental and artistic research methodologies.

Piracy is Normal, Piracy is Boring

What is often called ‘digital piracy’ is nowadays a mundane and everyday activity. As such, piracy is a commonplace disorder within the order of information capitalism; it is both created by the ubiquitous orders of information capitalism and suppressed by those orders. In the myriad points of view of its participants piracy represents an order which is implicit within contemporary life, which we will call ‘pirarchy’.

The attached chapter entitled ‘Piracy is Normal, Piracy is Boring: systemic disruption as everyday life’ by Francesca da Rimini and Jonathan Marshall was written for the book Piracy: Leakages from Modernity edited by Martin Fredriksson and James Arvanitakis (Litwin Press, USA, forthcoming 2012, http://litwinbooks.com/piracy.php).

Save Leyton Marshes

This is an image taken from a walk, together with 'those guys', we have been 'beating the bounds' with willow sticks. The picture here shows activists who defend the marshes of the River Lea valley as a common land, based on ancient rights, which get remembered once a year by walking along the boundaries of the common land.

Save Leyton Marshes

Fieldwork

Fieldwork

Solidarity With the Occupy Movement from Kerala

Solidarity With the Occupy Movement from Kerala

Communist shrine

Such little shrines -- and I really do not have any other word for it as those serve no particular function -- you find everywhere in Kerala. It seems Marxism is the fourth belief system in Kerala, besides Hinduism, Christianity and Islam.

Communist shrine

Ropemaker

This lady was part of a group making rope from coir using an old technique.

Ropemaker

Kerala Means Colour

Just an image taken at the roadside ...

Kerala Means Colour

Elephants at Temple Festival in Kerala

Temple festival near Kollam, January 2012.
Some background and more beautiful images of elephants: http://www.chitra-aiyer.com/blog/2010/11/elephant-camp-aana-kota.html

Elephants at Temple Festival in Kerala

Big Daddy v Open Data

The JSTOR Case - US Government v Aaron Swartz

Although we have thus far discussed P2P file-sharing in terms of its most representative instances, that is, the exchange of materials drawn from popular culture, other artefact classes are also swapped, from pornography to ‘serious’ publications. Sometimes genre-specific events can bring into focus larger issues arising from cultural commodification, public domain contraction, and resultant counter actions and movements. For example, recently American digital activist Aaron Swartz allegedly downloaded a massive number of papers from the JSTOR academic database. Subsequently the United States Government brought unprecedented charges against him, claiming that he planned to release the material through P2P networks. This case demonstrates how even the spectre of unsubstantiated file-sharing can trigger disordering responses across informational domains (academia, publishing, policing, justice), some of which which might be more rooted in emotions (anger, fear, revenge, spite, etc.) than in pragmatic circumspection.

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